State Representatives announce intentions to reinstate tax deductions

State Representatives announce intentions to reinstate tax deductions

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RAMSEY — On Monday Rep. Josh Gottheimer and Rep. Bill Pascrell announced their intentions to reinstate the state and local tax deduction known as SALT.

They spoke in front a giant salt pile which they explained represents the magnitude of the revolt they’ve seen against the federal tax hike bill.

The new federal tax code placed a $10,000 cap on state and local tax deductions. Rep. Gottheimer and Rep. Pascrell say families in New Jersey will be affected and need to come up with more money for taxes without a pay increase.

Eleventh child dies from adenovirus illness

Eleventh child dies from adenovirus illness

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HASKELL — An 11th child treated at the Wanaque Center for Nursing and Rehabilitation in Haskell, New Jersey has died as a result of the adenovirus outbreak.

The child died Thursday night in a Haskell hospital outside of the Wanaque center. State officials, including Gov. Murphy, addressed the ongoing situation Friday morning during a press conference.

“This is one of these viruses and sadly we have seen just that,” says Gov. Murphy.

State health Commissioner Shereef Elnahal discussed steps they’ve been taking to help the center, including calling for help from volunteers to help separate healthy and sick patients. A measure that, until recently, hasn’t been possible.

This particular adenovirus is common to communal settings and causes serious illness. Immune compromised children cannot get the vaccine for this strain.

The outbreak is not over until four weeks after the health department records the final case. Officials confirmed another diagnosis last night, bringing the total amount of pediatric cases to 34.

Snow cripples motorists at the height of the evening commute

Snow cripples motorists at the height of the evening commute

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PARAMUS — Thursday’s snow brought a strong punch from Mother Nature. The snow stranded many commuters hit on their way home.

“I’m going to go eat something wait until it opens up and then try to make my commute which should have been an hour and a half and is now four hours,” said Ray Skeeter, who was just trying to do his normal commute from Elizabeth, New Jersey to Orange County, New York. The snow forced him to stop at the Westfield Mall in Paramus. “It’s the ice, the ice and the snow and I don’t think many people expected it to be this bad,” Skeeter added.

Skeeter was one of several people stranded at the mall because of the bad weather.

The road conditions were very poor and rough near Newark. There was also traffic bumper – to – bumper with very little movement on the roads.

NJ Supreme Court ruling means 20,000 DWI convictions may be thrown out

NJ Supreme Court ruling means 20,000 DWI convictions may be thrown out

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A new ruling by the Supreme Court of New Jersey means that over 20,000 breathalyzer tests conducted by police could be thrown out.

The tests were found inadmissible because the devices used to give the tests were not calibrated properly, this stemming from criminal charges against State Police Sergeant Marc Dennis who was supposed to be calibrating them.

The decision vacated the DWI conviction of now-deceased Eileen Cassidy, who took legal action after discovering she had one of the allegedly tainted tests. According to Cassidy’s lawyer, defendants affected by the tests will be notified.

During an unrelated press conference, Attorney General Gurbir Grewal said that his office was still reviewing the decision and trying to come up with guidance for their county and municipal prosecutors who handled the cases.

It is unclear how many of the 20,000 affected cases will be thrown out.

NJ attorney general files lawsuit against Janssen Pharmaceuticals

NJ attorney general files lawsuit against Janssen Pharmaceuticals

THE ONE PLACE FOR WHAT'S HAPPENING IN NEW JERSEY.

NEWARK – New Jersey Attorney General Gurbir Grewal announced on Tuesday that the state had filed a lawsuit against Janssen Pharmaceuticals as a part of the ongoing fight against the opioid crisis.

“Today we are holding Janssen accountable,” Grewal said. “We allege that for years Janssen pharmaceuticals Inc., a holy subsidiary of Johnson & Johnson, aggressively and deceptively marketed its prescription opioid products to the people of NJ knowing full well that its products carried a high risk for addiction and abuse.”

The suit, which is about the drugs Nucynta and Nucynta ER, was submitted Tuesday in Superior Court in Mercer County. Janssen is based out of Raritan and Johnson & Johnson is based out of New Brunswick.

The state highlighted allegations against the company like the use of two types of deception, minimizing the risk of opioids in general and attempting to make its appear opioids different from other’s by promoting them as safer, milder and less addictive, which the state called deceptive.

The company was used an unbranded marking campaign, which used writing and web content that looked independent from the company, that the state said was designed to embed its deceptions about the viability of long-term opioid use.

Also alleging the company targeted elderly and non-opioid users and promoted a bogus clinical theory, which the state again called misleading.

“Janssen did all of this in an effort to increase its bottom line,” Grewal said.

Janssen did sell the drugs in question back in 2015 for a billion dollars, but the attorney general says they still have to be held accountable for the damage they caused.

The complaint asks that Janssen pay civil penalties, repay its ill-gotten gains, and pay damages for false claims submitted to the state. Also asking them to stop all unlawful practices and correct its misrepresentations.

This is the third case brought against an opioid manufacturer by the attorney general, who said that an unprecedented crisis prompts an unprecedented response.